FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions

Why did the Ombudman’s staff refer me to another office?

All complaints received by the Office of the Ombudsman are assessed by our Intake Officer to determine whether the complaint is against an “Authority” – that is, a public agency that is listed in Schedule A to the Ombudsman’s Act. If the complaint is against an agency not listed in our Schedule, our office does not have the jurisdiction to investigate. See examples of who cannot be investigated by the Ombudsman on this website for further information.

The Ombudsman cannot investigate:

  • Court decisions, including actions of judges and lawyers acting on behalf of the government
  • Private companies or individuals
  • The Federal Government
  • Doctors or Lawyers
  • Police
  • Unions
  • Surveyors or Real Estate Agents

If the complaint falls within our office’s jurisdiction, there may be other remedies available that might resolve your concerns. Public agencies have a responsibility and should have an opportunity to resolve disputes before we get involved. The Ombudsman encourages people to first try to resolve their complaint with the agency concerned. If after exhausting those remedies you remain concerned that there has been unfairness or that the remedy was inadequate to address the problem, you may contact us and we will see what we can do to assist you.